Highlands of Iceland

  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Nach Norden sind im Abstieg aus der Askja Sellandafjall, Bláfjall und Lokatindur zu sehen
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Über die Ebene geht der Blick zum Snæfell und dem sanften Nordhang der Vaðalda
  • Auch von der Álftadalsdyngja ist der markante Berg zu sehen
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Blick vom Gipfel des Snæfell nach Süden
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Die Askja markiert das Ende des zweiten Drittels des Treks
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Das Dyngjufelldalur
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Die Aussicht von der Passhöhe in die Caldera der Askja ist atemberaubend
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland
  • Wie ein Spiegel liegen flache Seen in der Álftadalsdyngja
  • Central and southern highlands of Iceland

The Highlands of Iceland – Another Planet

The highlands of Iceland are unique and a gem of European landscapes. Vast deserts, formed by glaciers, volcanoes and wind. Beautiful lakes surrounded by steep mountain ridges. Rivers running through graslands and magma fields of young and old. Tremendous fissures and cracks giving evidence of the elemtal forces below the surface. And above all the biggest glaciers of Europe covering some of the most powerful volcanoes of the island. It is an isolated landscape, open to the people only for a few months during summertime, but perfect for long hiking and escaping the monotony of daily routine. You won’t probably see even one other person during one or two weeks when exploring the most remote regions. There are virtually no possibilities to supply yourself with food. There are no camping sites, let alone hotels and therefore barely tourists. Up there you will meet people with stories to tell like the guy I met there in 2010, who was on antidepressants, close to kill himself until he first saw and wandered through this landscape. Now he returns every year.

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